The Post (2017)

Remember when journalism was about real matters and issues and you didn’t have to double check everything that was written or published and what those in power told us? Well those days are almost over – perhaps due to the very reasons discussed in films such as All the President’s Men (1976) and more recently Spotlight (2015). Well The Post starring Meryl Streep and Tom Hanks is more of the same vein – in fact Hanks plays Ben Bradlee who was played by Jason Robards in All the President’s Men (for which Robards won an Oscar) and co-written by Josh Singer who wrote Spotlight.

The film is based on an interesting period of time which the Washington Post was going through, it was losing revenue so was considering floating with an initial public offering (IPO) and the ownership had transferred to Katharine Graham (played by Meryl Streep) who took over after her husband committed suicide – who had taken over from Graham’s father. It was at this time the Pentagon Papers were leaked by an internal source stating that the government had been lying to the the public about the Vietnam war – it was a damming statement which said that the government had known that they could not win the war in Vietnam but to save humiliation carried on sending young men to their deaths.

The leaked source originally sent the papers to the New York Times but when they published, President Nixon ordered a judge to stop the paper publishing anymore as it was against national security. It was then the Post editor Bradlee asked his staff Ben Bagdikian (Bob Odenkirk) to get something which he did when he got most of the papers from Daniel Ellsberg. We then see Bradlee push to get the papers published but there is the threat of all those involved going to prison if they do so. It is at the point we see Katharine having to make a decision that could jeopardise everyone involved.

The film is a pretty good breakdown of the various social situations and views at the time, for example Katharine is the only woman in the boardroom and has difficulty adjusting to work as she has never worked because she has been expected to stay at home to raise the children and host parties. We see a fragile and doubting Streep – who is good in this, but she has never really been bad in anything – well perhaps her singing in Mama Mia? Anyway, the transformation in her is subtle but not too forced, and she does deliver a good line,

‘It’s my decision, and I am going to bed’

Hanks like Streep is good as always, and there is nothing wrong with Spielberg’s directing, but all in all I sort of felt this was more of a made for TV affair rather than cinema hence why I initially hesitated at seeing it in the cinema and saw it now on DVD. Everyone does their job (including John Williams doing music) but it feels like a timid piece, one that sort of becomes forgettable – unfortunately. I felt it was almost pushed and done in expedited fashion to combat the actions of the Trump administration.

Nevertheless I felt it was relevant especially in comparison to today’s fast moving pace of news, the dying print media where facts are probably checked after they are put out or not put out at all due to injunctions, in the age of fake news where everything is questioned and refuted, perhaps we need more good journalists being backed by strong editors who are willing to take a risk in order to bring those in power to account, and less sensationalised drivel and gossip. It is perhaps then the public can start to build trust in its media and politicians – perhaps.

Rating 3/5

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